Kenya nominates Cabinet Secretary, Amina Mohamed for World Trade Organisation DG – Ventures Africa

Kenya nominates Cabinet Secretary, Amina Mohamed for World Trade Organisation DG  Ventures Africa
“nigeria startups when:7d” – Google News

Investment Firms Market Plying for Significant Growth 2025 | Accel, Comcast Ventures, Y Combinator, Accomplice, Advanon, 500 Startups – Daily Research Chronicles

Investment Firms Market Plying for Significant Growth 2025 | Accel, Comcast Ventures, Y Combinator, Accomplice, Advanon, 500 Startups  Daily Research Chronicles
“nigeria startups when:7d” – Google News

New €76 million VC fund Eir Ventures aims to leverage the untapped potential of health care innovation in Europe

The Life Science venture fund Eir Ventures today announced a first closing of its new fund of €76 million. With a strong base in the Nordic region and a team of experienced life science investors, Eir Ventures will invest in innovative European companies with products and technologies addressing significant unmet medical need and a potential to improve the life of patients. The fund is launched with support from a investor syndicate comprising Saminvest, the European Investment Fund (EIF), Vækstfonden, Novo Holdings, as well as additional private investors.

Eir Ventures has been set up by an experienced team of life science investors, including Magnus Persson, Stephan Christgau, Andreas Segerros as the Managing Partners, and Amanda Hayward as Special Partner. With offices in Stockholm and Copenhagen, Eir Ventures will invest in high return potential opportunities in the Nordics, Europe and the US. The fund will have a particular focus on innovations from the leading universities and incubators in the Nordics and has established collaborations with select Nordic Universities.

Magnus Persson, Managing Partner of Eir Ventures, commented: “In the current environment, where financing has become even more sparse and startups are struggling to fund development, healthcare innovation is more important than ever. We see great potential to bring some of the highly innovative treatments to patients with underserved medical needs, while also bringing outstanding returns to our investors.”

EU-Startups

South Africa in talks with Macleods Pharmaceuticals to produce state owned HIV drugs – Ventures Africa

South Africa in talks with Macleods Pharmaceuticals to produce state owned HIV drugs  Ventures Africa
“nigeria startups when:7d” – Google News

Nigerian government offers 60 percent debt relief for broadcast stations in the country – Ventures Africa

Nigerian government offers 60 percent debt relief for broadcast stations in the country  Ventures Africa
“nigeria startups when:7d” – Google News

How European seed firm Connect Ventures finds ‘product-first’ founders

Connect Ventures, the London-based seed-stage VC that was an early investor in Citymapper and Typeform announced a new $ 80 million fund last month to continue investing in “product-led” founders.

Launched back in 2012, when there was a shortage of institutional capital at seed stage in Europe and micro VC was a novelty in the region, Connect Ventures invests in B2B and consumer software across Europe, including SaaS, fintech, digital health and “future of work.”

Running throughout the firm’s investment thesis is a product focus, with the belief that product-led — or “product-first” — software entrepreneurs are the kinds of founders most likely to transform the way we live and work at scale.

Connect Ventures does fewer deals per year than many seed-stage firms, promising to place bets in a smaller number of early-stage companies. It recently backed scaling startups such as Curve and TrueLayer. Keeping a compact portfolio lets the shop throw more support behind its investments to help tip the scales toward success.

To learn more about Connect’s strategy going forward, I put questions to partners Sitar Teli, Pietro Bezza and Rory Stirling. We covered what makes a product-first founder, the upsides and downside of “conviction investing,” and the next digital product opportunities in fintech, health and the future of work.

TechCrunch: Connect Ventures positions itself as a pan-European VC investing in “product-led” founders at seed stage. Can you be more specific with regards to check size, geography and the types of startups you look for?

Sitar Teli: Of course, I know it can be hard to differentiate seed funds at first glance, so it’s worth digging in one layer down. Connect is a thesis-led, seed stage, product-centric fund that invests across Europe. I know we’re going to dive into some of those parts later, so I’ll focus on our investment strategy and what we look for. We lead seed rounds of £1-£2 million (sometimes less, sometimes more) and make 8-10 investments a year. Low volume, high conviction, high support is the investment strategy we’ve executed since we started eight years ago.

Startups – TechCrunch

Organise, a platform for worker rights, raises £570K seed funding led by Ada Ventures

Organise, a U.K. startup that has built a platform to help workers organise and campaign for better rights, has raised £570,000 in seed funding.

The round is led by Ada Ventures, fitting into the VC firm’s remit to back “overlooked markets and founders”. Also participating is Form Ventures, RLC Ventures (a seed-stage fund who commit a portion of their profits back to charitable causes chosen by founders), and Ascension Ventures via its Fair By Design Fund.

Founded in 2017 by CEO Nat Whalley and CTO Bex Hay, Organise describes itself as a “worker-driven network” that provides and range of digital tools and support to enable anyone to start a campaign to improve their working conditions. The idea is to combine the power of collective action, traditionally harnessed by trade unions, with the reach and insight of modern digital campaigns.

That makes sense. given its founders’ resumes. Whalley has a background in political campaigning at 38 Degrees and Avaaz, and also ran ChangeLab, a digital agency building campaigning technology.  And Hay was formerly the tech director at 38 Degrees, and also ran Amazon Anonymous, leading her to be dubbed “the thorn in Jeff Bezos’ side”.

“With so many people working remotely, it’s harder to share your problems with colleagues or raise issues about work,” says Whalley. “When people run into issues around unsafe environments or concerns about unfair pay or maternity rights, they have nowhere to turn for support. We provide a way to bring workers together and give them the tools needed to make themselves heard. Our platform empowers individuals, groups and workplaces, helping them to affect meaningful change”.

Whalley explains that users discover Organise in one of three ways: they’re looking to change something in their workplace and discover Organise as a way to make that happen; they join a campaign someone else in their workplace has already started; or they join a campaign calling for a national-level change related to the world of work.

“When people join Organise, we ask them to share their workplace and employment status,” she says. “The platform is then able to connect employees to existing networks of people from the same organisation, immediately enabling them to speak with one, much louder voice. For new campaigns, we can help people build up the awareness they need to get colleagues or workers from across their industry on board.

“Once part of the network, users are in control of their campaigns. They decide what change they want and we provide the tools to make it happen. This might be through surveys, calls to sign petitions, or open letters to decision makers”.

To date, Organise has enabled workers to mount successful campaigns against unjust working practices at companies including McDonald’s, Ted Baker, Amazon, Uber and Deliveroo. No doubt helped by the coronavirus crisis and resulting pressure on workers, the platform has grown from 90,000 to 400,000 members in the last three months.

Asked if Organise is designed to be an alternative to unions or to work with them, Whalley says the platform is complementary to union activities and that many of its members are union members too.

“They use the Organise tools to enhance their impact and increase their reach,” she adds. “For others, Organise makes it possible to bring colleagues together around a single issue where time is of the essence. The dynamic nature of the tools we provide and the speed at which campaigns can get off the ground can be exactly what employees need to drive through meaningful change”.

On competitors, Whalley says Organise is the only platform empowering workers’ rights at scale. There are also whistleblowing platforms in existence, like Vault, which she points out is paid for by companies, “meaning it’s not ultimately in the interests or control of the workers”.

Meanwhile, the business model is simple enough and, I’m told, is working. Organise is free for anyone to join but also offers paid-for, enhanced support for those who need it.

Around 5% of users pay a subscription (usually £1 – £2 a week, depending on income) for enhanced support. This includes employment advice and access to a peer-to-peer forum. “Because it’s paid for by the individuals who will ultimately benefit from it, we can scale and sustain impact at the same time,” says Whalley.

Startups – TechCrunch

Weekly Economic Index: Nigeria hikes petrol price, speaks to Saudi over OPEC output cut deal – Ventures Africa

Weekly Economic Index: Nigeria hikes petrol price, speaks to Saudi over OPEC output cut deal  Ventures Africa
“nigeria startups when:7d” – Google News