[Plenty in Los Angeles Times] No dirt? No farm? No problem. The potential for soil-less agriculture is huge

Imagine kale that doesn’t taste like a punishment for something you did in a previous life. Envision leafy greens that aren’t limp from their journey to your plate. Anticipate the intense flavor of just-picked herbs that kick up your latest culinary creation a notch or three.

Read more here.

The post [Plenty in Los Angeles Times] No dirt? No farm? No problem. The potential for soil-less agriculture is huge appeared first on OurCrowd Blog.

OurCrowd Blog

HELP: start a Blog for validating a potential user’s problem.

I want to validate that : – there is a real problem “X” for – a potential users “K” and consequently open a channel with the them. Can a blog helps with this? (Start a blog from 0) I was thinking that a Blog talking specifically to a problem X can help me filter people who actually care about it or they have the same problem/state of mind, and for so it would grow my chance to yes, understand if the problem really exist, but also identifies the potential users, if any.

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

Looking to gain feedback/recommendation on Director of Sales/Growth role (Churn Problem)

Hi everyone – I hope the day is going well. I recently landed a director of sales/growth role at a rapidly growing SaaS company and our goal is to double our revenue and break $ 1mm this year.

So we have an opposite problem that many startup companies face; we have an abundance of clients utilizing our platform (sales has a steady flow) but we, however, may not understand the relationship our client has with the platform (churn rate has a steady flow).

The best analogy I thought of today is how our platform currently operates like an overflowing sink with fish in the bowl. The faucet is steadily pouring "water" into the bowl, the "drain" is halfway open/closed, and the "fish" will, eventually, go down the drain or be rescued by our team.

Water = Sales/Leads

Drain = Churn Rate

Fish = Active Clients

The biggest issue is our churn rate. And it’s not that our customers are dissatisfied, it’s that they use our platform for only one needed purpose and then leave once completed.

I believe that the main focus is to ensure we are capitalizing on our active client base while the relationship is warm and engaged. Currently, we are engaging with our active clients and identifying:

–If they are utilizing our platform as a team management and collaboration tool or more for single, individual use.

–Further selling points and introductions to decision makers (selling to the whole organization/multiple seats).

–Build stronger relationships and become "sticky" in an organization/companies daily operation and structure.

–The overall knowledge that the clients may have on the true power of the platform (can be utilized for all marketing, sales, on-boarding, strategic development efforts).

What we are trying to accomplish:

Our goal is to become “sticky” among our customer base. We speculate that our churn is high because we have many individual users rather than team-based customers. So, I guess my reason for reaching out is to hear some best practices or recommendations on how others have gone from having their customer base become more focused on selling to teams as a whole vs. individual customers.

Things I have done (so far):

–I sort out business emails that have already have AT LEAST one paying seat. From there, I call (if a number is provided) or email each customer and try to schedule a demo call.

—-During that process of a demo call, I learn more about their team size, how they intend to use our platform, etc.

–Email campaigns to active client base

–Began outreach to accelerators, incubators, cohorts, higher ed. Institutions for larger partnership opportunities.

Tools:

–Pipedrive

–ChartMogul (highlights our newest customers, churned customers, renewing customers within 7 days, free trial signups).

Again, our goal is to shift to more team sales (multiple seats) rather than individual sales. A super good article that explains what we are trying is: https://sacks.substack.com/p/individuals-or-teams-whos-the-better

I hope I explained the situation well enough and I would love any constructive feedback.

-Brian

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

“Hire problem solvers and give them autonomy”: Interview with serial entrepreneur Dan Murray-Serter

Dan Murray-Serter is a serial entrepreneur. He is currently co-founder and CEO at Heights, a smart supplement to boost brain health. He also hosts one of UK’s top business podcasts, Secret Leaders, which features interviews with influential founders. Previously, he was co-founder of Grabble, an award-winning, viral social commerce app. We caught up with Dan…

This content is for members only. Visit the site and log in/register to read.

The post “Hire problem solvers and give them autonomy”: Interview with serial entrepreneur Dan Murray-Serter first appeared on EU-Startups.

EU-Startups

Articulating Problem Statements

How long should a problem statement be? What do I need to include? Any useful source to share?

  1. Be specific
  2. Clearly identify your target market
  3. Define the size of ghe market and the specific problem
  4. Define the current alternatives (how bad they're)
  5. Am I missing something?

Cheers!

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

Why You Should Start a Business to Solve a Common Problem

Silicon Valley is known for its revolutionary ideas, grandiose statements and ability to challenge the status quo. By now, we’re all familiar with the classic persona of the Bay Area-located, hoodie-wearing techie, who tells their team to “move fast and break things” in order to “disrupt” entire industries.

However, what those promising to change the world from their Silicon Valley office often forget is that so many of the big tech giants began by addressing a small but present pain point within a specific community.

Ultimately, finding a simple but important problem and matching it with the best solution possible will always be the foundation of a successful business. You don’t need to set out to become a multi-billion-dollar business and uproot entire systems in order to have impact.


Your Guide to the Season’s Hottest Gifts from Dell: Download Now and Save up to 39% Off

Silicon Valley narrative is often damaging to budding founders

The big tech scene tends to promote the idea that startups must seek to change the world with their new products or services. Venture capital (VC) investors in the Valley further compound this notion by consistently channeling their funds into high-risk, high-return companies with plans to disrupt entire industries.

Unfortunately, this emphasis on world-changing, fast-growing startups has bred cases such as that of Theranos, the blood testing startup (once valued at $ 9 billion) which was exposed to be fraudulently generating false results and posing safety risks to patients. Former Theranos CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes is now facing criminal charges.

The case of Theranos is a symptom of this very problem: It’s important to note how a culture of world-changing products drives aspiring and existing entrepreneurs to think that there’s only one way to build a business in today’s climate.


Related: Why Problem-First Thinking is the Solution Your Startup Needs

Tech giants started with small problems

Many of today’s biggest tech companies began in humble pursuit of solving a common but simple problem within a certain sector.

Take Facebook, the world’s biggest social network, for example. The platform now boasts billions of users, yet it began as a tool to connect Harvard University students to one another.

Airbnb is another great example. Airbnb started off as a way for people to rent out their spare rooms (or air mattresses) as a stopgap to help them pay rent. The global platform now offers bespoke experiences as well as every single type of accommodation you could ask for.

And of course, nothing quite says “humble beginnings” quite like Jeff Bezos selling books online out of his garage. Amazon is now the highest-value company in the world, with products ranging from cloud services to smart speakers.

With so many of the world’s biggest companies starting off by solving a small problem, the message is clear: new startups need not focus only on disrupting an entire industry to succeed.

Find one small problem and solve it really well

Budding entrepreneurs should begin with a simple problem (ideally one which they themselves have), and find a way to solve it really well. Even if your product just creates a way for your customers to save a few minutes a day by eliminating a monotonous task, there’s potential for growth in the current climate in which everyone is fighting for more time in the day.

The B2B sector has seemingly endless potential for products that help people save time, be more productive and drive efficiencies. Aspiring entrepreneurs should consider the opportunities in the B2B space over the notoriously difficult B2C environment. For example, instead of creating an app whose mission is to help the entire world sleep better, build a platform that companies can use to support employees’ sleep patterns, and go from there.


Sign Up: Receive the StartupNation newsletter!

Use foundational principles to build a solid base

If you choose to reject the Silicon Valley playbook of global disruption, remember that you still need to have a clear vision for your product. Start with the why, the how, and the what of your product. It’s best to begin with a small team of developers for any digital product, as too many cooks spoil the broth during the initial phases of development.

This small team should be full of expertise, though, and remember that diversity of thought helps build better products, so it’s good to have people from different backgrounds on board.

Ultimately, whatever your vision, you should be able to sell it to your team. If your team doesn’t buy into what you’re doing, they’ll struggle to take ownership of it and bring their own ideas to the table. Once you have this clear vision for your solution and a solid team of experts that are invested in bringing it to life, you can set your sights on bringing it into fruition.

Silicon Valley will always have its place in the startup world, but it’s important for new founders to remember that the whole tech world doesn’t exist within Silicon Valley. Rather than aspiring to be the next Uber or Amazon, emerging entrepreneurs should focus on simple but effective solutions, doing what they know best.

The post Why You Should Start a Business to Solve a Common Problem appeared first on StartupNation.

StartupNation

Why You Should Start a Business to Solve a Common Problem

Silicon Valley is known for its revolutionary ideas, grandiose statements and ability to challenge the status quo. By now, we’re all familiar with the classic persona of the Bay Area-located, hoodie-wearing techie, who tells their team to “move fast and break things” in order to “disrupt” entire industries.

However, what those promising to change the world from their Silicon Valley office often forget is that so many of the big tech giants began by addressing a small but present pain point within a specific community.

Ultimately, finding a simple but important problem and matching it with the best solution possible will always be the foundation of a successful business. You don’t need to set out to become a multi-billion-dollar business and uproot entire systems in order to have impact.


Your Guide to the Season’s Hottest Gifts from Dell: Download Now and Save up to 39% Off

Silicon Valley narrative is often damaging to budding founders

The big tech scene tends to promote the idea that startups must seek to change the world with their new products or services. Venture capital (VC) investors in the Valley further compound this notion by consistently channeling their funds into high-risk, high-return companies with plans to disrupt entire industries.

Unfortunately, this emphasis on world-changing, fast-growing startups has bred cases such as that of Theranos, the blood testing startup (once valued at $ 9 billion) which was exposed to be fraudulently generating false results and posing safety risks to patients. Former Theranos CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes is now facing criminal charges.

The case of Theranos is a symptom of this very problem: It’s important to note how a culture of world-changing products drives aspiring and existing entrepreneurs to think that there’s only one way to build a business in today’s climate.


Related: Why Problem-First Thinking is the Solution Your Startup Needs

Tech giants started with small problems

Many of today’s biggest tech companies began in humble pursuit of solving a common but simple problem within a certain sector.

Take Facebook, the world’s biggest social network, for example. The platform now boasts billions of users, yet it began as a tool to connect Harvard University students to one another.

Airbnb is another great example. Airbnb started off as a way for people to rent out their spare rooms (or air mattresses) as a stopgap to help them pay rent. The global platform now offers bespoke experiences as well as every single type of accommodation you could ask for.

And of course, nothing quite says “humble beginnings” quite like Jeff Bezos selling books online out of his garage. Amazon is now the highest-value company in the world, with products ranging from cloud services to smart speakers.

With so many of the world’s biggest companies starting off by solving a small problem, the message is clear: new startups need not focus only on disrupting an entire industry to succeed.

Find one small problem and solve it really well

Budding entrepreneurs should begin with a simple problem (ideally one which they themselves have), and find a way to solve it really well. Even if your product just creates a way for your customers to save a few minutes a day by eliminating a monotonous task, there’s potential for growth in the current climate in which everyone is fighting for more time in the day.

The B2B sector has seemingly endless potential for products that help people save time, be more productive and drive efficiencies. Aspiring entrepreneurs should consider the opportunities in the B2B space over the notoriously difficult B2C environment. For example, instead of creating an app whose mission is to help the entire world sleep better, build a platform that companies can use to support employees’ sleep patterns, and go from there.


Sign Up: Receive the StartupNation newsletter!

Use foundational principles to build a solid base

If you choose to reject the Silicon Valley playbook of global disruption, remember that you still need to have a clear vision for your product. Start with the why, the how, and the what of your product. It’s best to begin with a small team of developers for any digital product, as too many cooks spoil the broth during the initial phases of development.

This small team should be full of expertise, though, and remember that diversity of thought helps build better products, so it’s good to have people from different backgrounds on board.

Ultimately, whatever your vision, you should be able to sell it to your team. If your team doesn’t buy into what you’re doing, they’ll struggle to take ownership of it and bring their own ideas to the table. Once you have this clear vision for your solution and a solid team of experts that are invested in bringing it to life, you can set your sights on bringing it into fruition.

Silicon Valley will always have its place in the startup world, but it’s important for new founders to remember that the whole tech world doesn’t exist within Silicon Valley. Rather than aspiring to be the next Uber or Amazon, emerging entrepreneurs should focus on simple but effective solutions, doing what they know best.

The post Why You Should Start a Business to Solve a Common Problem appeared first on StartupNation.

StartupNation

Is “find a problem and solve it” able to explain all of billion dollar startups?

Just a small question. Aside from "find a problem and solve it" what are the methodologies to find viable statup product?

Like what did FB, Airbnb founders thought when they make those startups, did they think about their customer problems?

I'm interested in rigorous method to find viable Startup idea. (As rigorous as social science can be)

For background, I'm fullstack engineer (web,mobile mostly android,backend) in my early thirties trying to make a startup.(or should I find my co-founder first, some people do advise this one)

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!