Lithuanian unicorn Vinted acquires Dutch startup United Wardrobe to make second-hand fashion the first choice in Europe

Today Vinted, Europe’s largest online C2C marketplace dedicated to second-hand fashion, has announced the acquisition of United Wardrobe, the largest second-hand fashion platform in the Netherlands. The transaction will enable the combined group to accelerate its rapid expansion to new markets and extend its international footprint. With a combined member base of 34 million buyers…

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EU-Startups

Merck Foundation and First Ladies of Ghana and Nigeria Celebrate the Winners of “Stay at Home” Media Awards to Raise Awareness About Coronavirus – AiThority

Merck Foundation and First Ladies of Ghana and Nigeria Celebrate the Winners of “Stay at Home” Media Awards to Raise Awareness About Coronavirus  AiThority
“nigeria startups when:7d” – Google News

Day 2 of Annual Investment Meeting’s First Digital Edition Continues to Gain Momentum – Georgia Today

Day 2 of Annual Investment Meeting’s First Digital Edition Continues to Gain Momentum  Georgia Today
“nigeria startups when:7d” – Google News

NASA selects Nokia to build the first cellular network on the Moon

Nokia

For so long, we humans have fantasised about colonising the moon, dreamed about what life might look like, sketched plans to build launching pads, habitats, and whatnot. It has been 50 years since the first lunar landing, and still, it remains a dream. Sad times, we live in! However, a lot of activities are conducted by various space agencies around the globe in an attempt to explore and develop technologies to help us forge ahead as a space-faring species. 

The Tipping Point

In this regard, the Finnish Nokia in collaboration with NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) announced its expansion into a new market – ‘Moon’ after acquiring a deal to install the first LTE/4G cellular network on the moon. 

The $ 14.1M (approx €11M) contract awarded to Nokia Bell Labs comes as a part of NASA’s Artemis programme, the US government-funded crewed spaceflight program that has the goal of landing “the first woman and the next man” on the Moon by 2024. 

According to NASA, through the “Tipping Point” solicitation, the agency seeks industry-developed space technologies that can foster the development of commercial space capabilities and benefit future NASA missions. 

“A technology is considered at a tipping point if an investment in a demonstration will significantly mature the technology, increase the likelihood of infusion into a commercial space application, and bring the technology to market for both government and commercial applications,” it says. 

2022: A space odyssey

Nokia Bell Labs, the industrial research arm of Nokia will build and deploy the first ultra-compact, low-power, space-hardened, end-to-end LTE solution on the lunar surface in late 2022. Nokia is partnering with Intuitive Machines for this mission to deliver the equipment to the Moon on their lunar lander. 

The company says that the network will self-configure upon deployment and establish the first LTE communications system on the Moon. This network will provide critical communication capabilities for many different data transmission applications — vital command and control functions, remote control of lunar rovers, real-time navigation, and streaming of high definition video. 

According to Nokia, its LTE network – the precursor to 5G – is ideally suited for providing wireless connectivity for any activity that astronauts need to carry out, enabling voice and video communications capabilities, telemetry, and biometric data exchange, and deployment and control of robotic and sensor payloads.

Designed to withstand harsh conditions

Nokia’s lunar network consists of an LTE Base Station with integrated Evolved Packet Core (EPC) functionalities, LTE User Equipment, RF antennas, and high-reliability operations and maintenance (O&M) control software. As per the company claims, the network will be designed to withstand the harsh conditions of the launch and lunar landing and to operate in the extreme conditions of space. 

Nokia plans to supply commercial LTE products and provide technology to expand the commercialisation of LTE, and to pursue space applications of LTE’s successor technology, 5G.

The public-private partnerships established through Tipping Point selections combine NASA resources with industry contributions, shepherding the development of critical space technologies. NASA plans to leverage these innovations for its Artemis program, which will establish sustainable operations on the Moon by the end of the decade in preparation for an expedition to Mars.

Marcus Weldon, Chief Technology Officer at Nokia and Nokia Bell Labs President, says, “Reliable, resilient, and high-capacity communications networks will be key to supporting sustainable human presence on the lunar surface. By building the first high-performance wireless network solution on the Moon, Nokia Bell Labs is once again planting the flag for pioneering innovation beyond the conventional limits.” Notably, the 4G equipment can be updated to a super-fast 5G network in the future, says Nokia. 

Main image credits: Michael Vi/Shutterstock

Startups – Silicon Canals

NASA selects Nokia to build the first cellular network on the Moon

Nokia

For so long, we humans have fantasised about colonising the moon, dreamed about what life might look like, sketched plans to build launching pads, habitats, and whatnot. It has been 50 years since the first lunar landing, and still, it remains a dream. Sad times, we live in! However, a lot of activities are conducted by various space agencies around the globe in an attempt to explore and develop technologies to help us forge ahead as a space-faring species. 

The Tipping Point

In this regard, the Finnish Nokia in collaboration with NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) announced its expansion into a new market – ‘Moon’ after acquiring a deal to install the first LTE/4G cellular network on the moon. 

The $ 14.1M (approx €11M) contract awarded to Nokia Bell Labs comes as a part of NASA’s Artemis programme, the US government-funded crewed spaceflight program that has the goal of landing “the first woman and the next man” on the Moon by 2024. 

According to NASA, through the “Tipping Point” solicitation, the agency seeks industry-developed space technologies that can foster the development of commercial space capabilities and benefit future NASA missions. 

“A technology is considered at a tipping point if an investment in a demonstration will significantly mature the technology, increase the likelihood of infusion into a commercial space application, and bring the technology to market for both government and commercial applications,” it says. 

2022: A space odyssey

Nokia Bell Labs, the industrial research arm of Nokia will build and deploy the first ultra-compact, low-power, space-hardened, end-to-end LTE solution on the lunar surface in late 2022. Nokia is partnering with Intuitive Machines for this mission to deliver the equipment to the Moon on their lunar lander. 

The company says that the network will self-configure upon deployment and establish the first LTE communications system on the Moon. This network will provide critical communication capabilities for many different data transmission applications — vital command and control functions, remote control of lunar rovers, real-time navigation, and streaming of high definition video. 

According to Nokia, its LTE network – the precursor to 5G – is ideally suited for providing wireless connectivity for any activity that astronauts need to carry out, enabling voice and video communications capabilities, telemetry and biometric data exchange, and deployment and control of robotic and sensor payloads.

Designed to withstand harsh conditions

Nokia’s lunar network consists of an LTE Base Station with integrated Evolved Packet Core (EPC) functionalities, LTE User Equipment, RF antennas, and high-reliability operations and maintenance (O&M) control software. As per the company claims, the network will be designed to withstand the harsh conditions of the launch and lunar landing and to operate in the extreme conditions of space. 

Nokia plans to supply commercial LTE products and provide technology to expand the commercialisation of LTE, and to pursue space applications of LTE’s successor technology, 5G.

The public-private partnerships established through Tipping Point selections combine NASA resources with industry contributions, shepherding the development of critical space technologies. NASA plans to leverage these innovations for its Artemis program, which will establish sustainable operations on the Moon by the end of the decade in preparation for an expedition to Mars.

Marcus Weldon, Chief Technology Officer at Nokia and Nokia Bell Labs President, says, “Reliable, resilient, and high-capacity communications networks will be key to supporting sustainable human presence on the lunar surface. By building the first high-performance wireless network solution on the Moon, Nokia Bell Labs is once again planting the flag for pioneering innovation beyond the conventional limits.” Notably, the 4G equipment can be updated to a super-fast 5G network in the future, says Nokia. 

Main image credits: Michael Vi/Shutterstock

Startups – Silicon Canals

First Mover: As Ethereum Enthusiasm Builds, ‘Bear Case’ Could Still See Prices Double – Nasdaq

First Mover: As Ethereum Enthusiasm Builds, ‘Bear Case’ Could Still See Prices Double  Nasdaq
“nigeria startups when:7d” – Google News

Gogoro’s Eeyo 1s e-bike goes on sale in France, its first European market

Gogoro announced today that its Eeyo 1s is now available for sale in France, the smart electric bike’s first European market. Another model, the Eeyo 1, will launch over the next few months in France, Belgium, Monaco, Germany, Switzerland, Austria and the Czech Republic.

In France, the Eeyo 1s can be purchased through Fnac, Darty or, in Paris, Les Cyclistes Branchés. The Eeyo 1s is priced at €4699 including VAT, while the the Eeyo 1 will be priced at €4599, also including VAT.

The weight of Eeyo bikes is one of their key selling points and Gogoro says they are about half the weight of most other e-bikes. The Eeyo 1s weighs 11.9 kg and the Eeyo 1 clocks in at 12.4 kg.  Both have carbon fiber frames and forks, but the Eeyo 1s’ seat post, handlebars and rims are also carbon fiber, while on the Eeyo 1 they are made with an alloy.

Based in Taiwan, Gogoro first introduced its Eeyo lineup in May, making them available for sale in the U.S. first. The e-bikes are the company’s second type of vehicle after its SmartScooters, electric scooters that are powered by swappable batteries. The Eeyo bike’s key technology is the SmartWheel, a self-contained hub that integrates its motor, battery, sensor and smart connectivity technology so it can be paired with a smartphone app.

In an interview for the Eeyo’s launch, Gogoro co-founder and chief executive Horace Luke said the company began planning for Eeyo’s launch in 2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic. While sale of e-bikes were already growing steadily before COVID-19, the pandemic has accelerated sales of e-bikes as people avoid public transportation and stay closer to home. Several cities have also closed some streets to car traffic, making riders more willing to use bikes for short commutes and exercise.

Founded in 2011 and backed by investors including Temasek, Sumitomo Corporation, Panasonic, the National Development Fund of Taiwan and Generation (the sustainable tech fund led by former vice president Al Gore), Gogoro is best known for its electric scooters, but it is also working on a turnkey solution for energy-efficient vehicles to license to other companies, with the goal of reducing carbon emissions in cities around the world.

Startups – TechCrunch

Playbook, a fitness platform that puts creators first, raises $9.3 million

Playbook, aiming to be the Patreon of fitness content, has raised an additional $ 9.3 million in Series A funding from E.ventures, Michael Ovitz, Abstract, Algae Ventures, Porsche Ventures and FJ Labs.

The pandemic has hit the personal trainer and fitness industry incredibly hard. With gyms closed, trainers’ primary funnel for new customers has been shut down or slowed. Playbook looks to give them a revenue stream through their content.

Playbook creators are given tools to create videos and grow their audience. Unlike many fitness startups, Playbook really focuses on the creator side of the business rather than the final end user, believing that trainers can attract their own audience if they have the right tools and a platform to monetize them.

The company pays creators who bring their own audience to the platform (via their own unique link) an 80% cut of all revenue from those users. If users come to the platform agnostic of a certain creator, the trainer gets paid out based on seconds watched.

For the end user, the pricing is simple — it’s an all-you-can-eat model with a monthly subscription priced at $ 15/month or $ 99/year.

Playbook raised $ 3 million in seed back in June. The company has also attracted an impressive roster of trainers to the platform, including Boss Everline, trainer to Kevin Hart; Magnus Lygdback, trainer to Gal Gadot and Alicia Vikander; and Don Saladino, trainer to Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively.

Playbook co-founder and CEO Jeff Krahel said the main focus for the company is to double down on the technology services offered to creators, and the rest will follow.

“That’s part of the reason we brought on Michael Ovitz as a strategic investor,” said Krahel. “We are a tech-driven talent agency, a great tech platform with tools for creators. The future of the company is around supporting creators, almost like an accelerator, to maximize impact.”

Krahel is joined by two co-founders: Michael Wojcieszek and Kasper Ødegaard.

This latest round brings Playbook’s total funding to $ 12.3 million.

Startups – TechCrunch