How Different Generations Use Social Media


How Different Generations Use Social Media

With the advent of the internet, the world has turned into a global village. Humans, who are essentially social beings, have created internet-based ways to stay connected at all times. These internet-based platforms that allow us to stay connected are referred to as social media.

More than two-thirds of all internet users around the world find themselves on social media. Due to this urge to stay connected, the past decade has seen a substantial rise in the number of social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter among others.

Contrary to popular beliefs, these platforms attract not only the youth but also those of older generations. Roughly 3.8 billion people use social media. Although, the motives for adopting and using social media differ for different generations. While some wish to stay connected with old friends and family, others simply wish to have a platform to share their opinions.

Now, let us take a look at the different motives and habits of social media users. We will also examine how the personality and traits of individuals seemingly affect their social media habits.


Generation Z

Gen Z is a demographic cohort constituting people born between 1996 and 2015.

People belonging to this generation are digital natives – they’ve not seen a time before the internet or high-tech devices. Gen Zs have had their experiences with social media from an early age and have included this phenomenon as a part of their daily lifestyle.

Gen Z’s choice of social media platforms and content can be more accurately assessed if you know the characteristics of this generation –

  • Always Online: A survey conducted by Pew Research Center resulted that almost 45% of Gen Zs are always online, mostly on their mobile devices.
  • Have Unparalleled Access To Smartphones: Almost 95% of Gen Zs have a smartphone or access to one.
  • Loves Visuals: Gen Zs are visual learners. They are driven by visual content like photos and videos than written or textual content.
  • Privacy Conscious: Gen Z cares less about their data being used for personalised recommendations. But they do care for privacy on the whole. They don’t want to be spied upon.



What Do Gen Z Use Social Media For?

Generation Z use social media with a motive to –

  • Share daily life updates: Gen Z considers social media to be a place to keep everyone updated about their daily lives. They are the ones who post most pictures and updates about their lives on social media.
  • Develop A Personal Brand: Gen Zs are more driven towards individual achievements than any other generation. This makes them focus on their personal brand more than others. Gen Zs are content developers who use social media to develop their own brand.
  • Communicate with friends: Unlike older generations, people belonging to Gen Z are more connected to their friends via text, video calls and “snaps”.
  • Get over FOMO: FOMO, or the fear of missing out, too compels Gen Zs to keep a check on social media for updates from friends and acquaintances. They do so as they don’t want to miss out on current trends or glimpses that their friends share.
  • Make Most Of Micromoments: People belonging to this generation often check their social media newsfeeds and other applications regularly for a few minutes consuming a lot of short-form content.

Gen Z’s Favourite Social-Media Platforms

Gen Z’s characteristics and motives clearly indicate the social media platforms they use most. They prefer a platform that:

  • Is populated by visual content
  • Helps them develop their own brand
  • Let them communicate with ease
  • Is more personal

Hence, the obvious platforms that fit these descriptions are –


Instagram

Around 52% of Gen Zs use Instagram.

The reason?

Well, Instagram is specifically developed to target the digital natives. It’s an ecosystem that capitalises on the micromoments requirement. The platform makes use of –

  • Portrait orientation: Since Instagram aim is to capitalise on micromoments, it keeps its orientation to be portrait to make scrolling and content consumption easier.
  • Short form relevant content: Instagram constitutes mostly short-form content like stories, short videos, etc. that can be consumed within seconds.
  • Messaging: The platform has a handy text, image, and video messaging functionality that lets Gen Z users connect with other users with a tap.
  • Sharing: The posts can be shared with other users easily.
  • Brand building resources: Instagram is a content ecosystem which provides resources to build brand online. The ecosystem revolves around followership where users follow other users to show support.
  • Social networking: Users can like and comment on others’ posts which further aids smoother social networking.
  • Aesthetic appeal: Gen Zs are strongly influenced by the visual oriented content posted other users.

Snapchat

51% of Gen Zs in the US check Snapchat on a regular basis. It is the top social media application among US teens.

The reason?

Snapchat is considered to be privacy centric by Gen Z. It’s one such platform which is not flooded by older generation. Moreover, it involves self-deleting messages which teens prefer.

Besides this, here are other reasons why Snapchat found its way in Gen Z’s lifestyle –

  • Selfies and filters: Snapchat is known for its filters and provides its users with a rather unique selfie experience.
  • Celebrity lifestyle Information: An additional reason why Snapchat is so popular among this generation is that, like Instagram stories, Snapchat also enables users to follow their favourite celebrities and their lifestyles.


YouTube

Gen Zs are visual learners. They prefer to learn on YouTube than learning through apps, textbooks, etc. In fact, nearly 60% of Gen Zs prefer learning on YouTube, making this platform a go-to social media network for long-form content.

TikTok

TikTok was designed specially to cater to Gen Z. It focuses on short-form content, makes scrolling really easy, and is really easy to use.

But the north-star of TikTok is the emotional promise that anyone can go viral. Gen Z’s love for fame attracts them to this platform.


Gen Z’s Preferred content On Social Media Platforms

Social media is used by Gen Zs primarily during micromoments to check on the world.

They also find themselves being increasingly influenced by the content they find online. Gen Zs look for inspiration and ideas. They often end up following social media influencers for the same.

How much Time do Gen Z Spend on Social Media daily?

On an average, Gen Zs spend about 3 hours on social media per day.


Millennials

Millennials is a demographic cohort constituting people born between 1981 and 1995.

This generation is considered to be more educated and technologically advanced than its previous generations. The people belonging to this generation are most adaptable as they’ve lived a life before and after the advent of internet. They are more focused on social issues and are not afraid to take a stand.

Millennials choice of social media platforms and content can be more accurately assessed if you know the characteristics of this generation –

  • Tech Savy – Even though millennials are not tech-reliant, they are tech savy. They make sure to use the available tech to get their job done.
  • Early Adopters: This generation has witnessed so many changes that it has become a characteristic to look for something new.
  • Multi Taskers: Millennials is the pioneer generation with infinite choices. This made them multitaskers who live an on-the-go lifestyle.
  • Privacy-conscious: Millennials care for their privacy more than other generations.
  • Achievement-Oriented: Millennials seek the best possible outcome and even work hard to achieve it. They are even not afraid to question things.

What Do millennials Use Social Media For?

Millennials loves attention, connection, and recommendations. They use social media to –

  • Stay in touch with their friends and family and even make new connections. Millennials love the idea of new.
  • Overcome their FOMO and check on the latest updates. More than ¾ of millennials admit on being influenced or purchasing products based on the Instagram they follow.
  • Stay informed about different world issues.
  • Find something entertaining to read or watch.
  • Share content.


Millennials’ Favourite Social-Media Platforms

Millennials’ characteristics and motives clearly indicate the social media platforms they use most. They prefer a platform that:

  • Is populated by both textual and visual content
  • Provides with news and trends
  • Is focused more on content consumption
  • Lets them communicate with ease
  • Let them learn on their own pace
  • Is more public

Hence, the obvious platforms that fit these descriptions are –

Facebook

Being the pioneer users of Facebook, millennials are so accustomed to using Facebook and are so in pressure of the network effect that they are stuck with it now.

Moreover, Facebook is developed just to cater to the needs of this generation –

  • More textual content,
  • Link outs,
  • Easy scrolling,
  • Easy sharing,
  • Easy communication with others.

Facebook is a great platform for millennials to consume content and even get news of the world.

According to the 2020 Consumer Culture Report, 77% of millennials use Facebook daily.


Twitter

Millennials care more about the world and social issues than other generations. This is why they’re so fond of the micro-blogging website Twitter.

In fact, almost 61% of Twitter Users Are Millennials. They get their daily dose of news, trends, and even gossip from this social media network.

Moreover, the platform also forms their voice to support their causes.


Instagram

Instagram suits millennials’ on-the-go lifestyle. They get to consume short-form content during their breaks and even share their life with the world.

Moreover, Instagram also allows users of this generation to show their aspirational personality and build a brand.


YouTube

In the words of Google

  • Millennials are self-starters and doers: They like to learn things at their own pace.
  • For millennials, self-improvement trumps self-promotion: Millennials look for ways to improve their health, lifestyle, and take other recommendations to improve themselves.
  • Millennials like to dream: Millennials like to view a world in a different perspective through the eyes of other people.

All these requirements are catered to on Youtube which forms a go-to social media platform for millennials.

Millennials’ Preferred Content On Social Media Platforms

Millennials prefer both visual and textual content. They like reading opinions and even love recommendations.

In fact, social media play a big role in how millennials shop.

Beside this, the users of this generation typically are more likely to share content that they find appealing and informative with their friends and families.


How Much Time Do millennials Spend On Social Media Daily?

Millennials spend about over 2.5 hours on social media each day.

Generation X

Generation X is a demographic cohort constituting people born between 1965 and 1980.

This generation has lived through difficult economic times in the 1980s and has a specific set of characteristics that set them apart. They are –

  • Independent: This generation grew up with minimal adult supervision and thus learned the value of independence from early age.
  • Resourceful: Gen X’s problem-solving skill is more developed because of their experience.
  • Technologically Hybrid: They’ve seen a life before and after internet and are more technologically hybrid in doing work. But they are not the master of technology as the other two generations that came after them.
  • Financially Literate: Gen X saw the great depression. Hence, they know the value of money and are more careful with expenditures. Moreover, these people have started families, making them more conscious while spending.
  • Privacy Conscious: Gen X doesn’t like the idea of putting their personal lives on display on social media.
  • Advertisement Haters: Gen X has seen influential advertisements of the moon landing, the Cold War, the internet revolution, and the Y2K crisis etc. so they have a prejudice against advertisements.


What Do Gen X Use Social Media For?

Gen X loves information – be it related to their connections or the advertisement they saw on TV. They use internet and even social media to consume as much information they can (which can even be fake news).

They use social media to

  • Stay in touch only with people who matter – their friends and family.
  • Share their opinions with people who matter.
  • Research.
  • Consume information.

Gen X’s Favourite Social-Media Platforms

Gen Z’s characteristics and motives clearly indicate the social media platforms they use most. They prefer a platform that:

  • Is easy to use and operate
  • Is more visual (since they’re generation that grew up with television)
  • Provides with news and trends
  • Is focused more on content consumption
  • Lets them communicate with ease
  • Gives them importance
  • Provides a feeling of nostalgia (connect with friends, provide past information, etc.)

Hence, the obvious platforms that fit these descriptions are –

  • Facebook
  • Youtube
  • Instagram


Facebook

Those belonging to Generation X tend to be non-experimental. They stick to platforms that they are familiar with, and tend to steer away from trying out new platforms. Facebook is relatively the easiest to use social medium that most Gen-X’ers are familiar with, and hence, Facebook remains the most popular among this generation.

In fact, over 95% of Gen X’ers use Facebook.

They use it to connect with people who matter, consume information, get news and trends, and even share their opinions with ease.

YouTube

In the words of Google, Gen Z use YouTube to –

  • Embrace nostalgia: Gen X likes to view embrace nostalgia, be it in the form of past entertainment, people of the past, past advertisements, or even past pop culture.
  • Get news: Youtube is the go-to news source for Gen X.
  • Do things themselves: Since these people are more self reliant and independent, they use YouTube to master DIY skills and do work themselves.


Instagram

Unlike platforms like Snapchat and Twitter, which require time to figure out thoroughly, Instagram is easy to figure out.

Moreover, it provides an easy and visual access to know more about the brands and people who matter.

Gen X’s Preferred Content On Social Media Platforms

Gen X love visuals. They want to see more of their connections.

And when it comes to consuming content, they prefer personalisation and getting more importance.


How Much Time Do Gen X Spend On Social Media Daily?

This generation, on an average, spends a little less than an hour per day on social media.

Baby Boomers

Baby Boomers is a demographic cohort constituting people born between 1946 and 1964.

People belonging to this generation are the natives of the old media – newspapers, TV, radio, etc. They’ve seen the most dramatic change in technology and are arguably more used to changes. This is the generation that used to write letters to their friends and hence, love the idea of textual messages.

However, this generation is still not used to the idea of using smartphones to the fullest – majorly because of their old age. They are the ones who use the pointer finger instead of thumb to use smartphones.


What Do Baby Boomers Use Social Media For?

Unlike other generations, baby boomers still are reliant on old media. They still read magazines and watch TV.

But they do use social media, majorly to remain in contact with their friends and family. Baby boomers have spent most of their lives without any social media. Hence, they lost touch with friends. In the age of social media, reconnecting with is considered their biggest motives behind creating a social media account.

Baby Boomers Favourite Social-Media Platforms

Contrary to what many may think, an overwhelming 82.3% of baby boomers use at least once social networking site. 


Facebook

About 75% of all baby boomers in the US have an account on Facebook. It is undoubtedly considered the key medium of connecting with family and friends, and so it is no surprise that Facebook is the most popular medium among baby boomers.

YouTube

50% of all baby boomers online engage in watching videos online, with about 82% of these opting for YouTube for their video requirements.

YouTube does not really facilitate social networking like Facebook and Instagram, and is a platform that allows users to access Television content like the news and their favourite shows. This provides with both, information and entertainment, on demand.


baby Boomers Preferred Content On Social Media Platforms

Informative videos, preferably ones that are informative and slow paced, are a favourite among baby boomers. However, they don’t mind reading texts as well.

Facebook and YouTube happen to be their favourite platforms for videos. Videos keep them engaged, allow them new insights and teaches them new things that keep them up to date in the modern world.


How Much Time Do Baby Boomers Spend On Social Media Daily?

Baby boomers tend to be heavy internet users. On an average, they spend about 2 hours on social media per day.


Go On, Tell Us What You Think!

Did we miss something? Come on! Tell us what you think about our article on How Different Generations Use Social Media in the comments section.

Feedough

Is it moral to copy someone’s company in a different market?

Hi, I'm kinda having a "moral crisis" regarding the startup I've been building for the past 6 months. To give you some context – this is my 3rd tech company, definitely with the biggest potential. The only problem is that the idea isn't mine.

Like a year ago I came across this company on tech crunch (B2C, approx $ 20mil valuation, operating in a different market). They had the best product ideas, perfect branding with the most elegant website I've ever seen. I fell in love and decided to remake the company and launch it in my home county.

No one in my country knows this company (except VCs) and they'll very likely NEVER operate in this market. So I thought it would be a good idea to get "heavily inspired" from their branding, communication, values, website, etc (because it's so perfect). But we ended up copying almost everything. I took care of all the potential trademark and IP issues that might come up but that's not what I'm asking.

I always prided myself on being this moral entrepreneur full of ideas and now I'm making a fckin copycat… What's wrong with me?! We're already in the process of acquiring key partnerships, a few weeks from launch. I can't just start rebranding it. Is it even necessary? I mean we're not harming anyone, right? It only benefits the relationship with our customers. I'm really worried this might make us look stupid in the eyes of potential investors. In that case – we'd definitely have to remake it.

What do you think? Is this really a big deal or am I overreacting? Thanks!

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

What are some free resources by different countries for startups and small businesses?

What are some free resources by different countries for startups and small businesses which can help them to start or grow for free?

Reading posts in starup communities sounds like lots of American new entrepreneurs don't know about sba.gov ( they provide free lawyer, accounting, hr etc sponsored by government to help small businesses) and score.org (volunteer based network different skills ) .

Lets create list of all similar organizations world wide so it can be helpful for everyone. Please if you know any share with all of us include the country as well

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Can you make process at two different gigs simultaneously?

I see a lot of posts on this sub about people who finally get to a point where they quit their "main" gig to fully pursue their own venture. For those who haven't reached that stage yet, what have you found to be the best way to manage two gigs in parallel.

My current scenario is working for a Fortune 500 tech company as an account executive while also running a beverage startup. The shift to remote work has actually helped me a lot with managing both of these things which could easily take up all of my time by themselves. So although I feel like I've got a good rhythm, I still think that maybe I could be doing more in the time I have.

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What if I can build a Search Engine for business! No data will be lost! Refer back to all information at any time whenever you want. No more asking different departments for your answers. Imagine Google for your enterprise.

Hey guys,

I am running a startup and I often find my team often asks me questions that I have no answer too. Although we discussed on the topics earlier. I feel that we loose valuable data over time and we have no way to store it.

So, what if we build a system where all meeting details will be captured and then we can go through at any point of time and then build our own organisational Google.

As, I am already running a text-analytics company I thought it can be done easily. So, here goes my wild imagination.

  1. Create a BOT that will join all the meeting platforms and record the meetings.
  2. Store the meeting data and retrive information, use NLP and AI to categorise the data.

So do this, we have build the first version of the product –

  1. An AI-BOT that joins all the meetings on Google Meet, Zoom, Microsoft Teams.
  2. Action Items + Summary + Highlights + Decision Points + Questions + Metrics
  3. Full-Transcript + Speaker information.
  4. Meeting notes share functionality with others.

This also servers as a personal NOTE taker. And I personally feel with this, we can save 30% of our daily work time.

Eventually we can use this data as a Google for enterprises, do data will be lost and you can always refer back to all your information. In the future, we can build a search engine for your enterprise.

If want to check out the first version of the application here is the link – www.rechord.ai

We are in BETA, so if please excuse us if you will encounter any problem.

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Netflix Is Taking On A Different Strategy To Capture Africa’s ‘Unique’ Market – WeeTracker Media

Netflix Is Taking On A Different Strategy To Capture Africa’s ‘Unique’ Market  WeeTracker Media
“nigeria startups when:7d” – Google News

What makes Checkout.com different from Stripe

While Checkout.com has kept a low profile for many years, the company raised $ 380 million within a year and reached an impressive valuation of $ 5.5 billion. It wants to build a one-stop shop for all things related to payments, such as accepting transactions, processing them and detecting fraud.

You might think that it sounds a bit like Stripe. In an interview at TechCrunch Disrupt, I asked founder and CEO Guillaume Pousaz what makes Checkout.com different from Stripe, Adyen and other companies in the payment space. It comes down to a very different philosophy when it comes to product and market approach.

“We only do enterprise. We really only work with the big merchants. There are a few exceptions here and there but it’s mostly enterprise-only and it’s purely online,” Pousaz said.

“I once met [Stripe CEO] Patrick Collison and I joked with him. I said you might have a million merchants, I have 1,200 merchants but I know every single one by name and they all process tens of millions every year. So I think it’s just a different business,” he added later in the interview.

Checkout.com now has a ton of money sitting in its bank account, but it has been a long and slow journey to reach that level. The company has been around for many years and reached profitability in 2012. It has been spending very meticulously over the years.

When talking about the early days of the company, Pousaz said the team grew really slowly. “We can hire one employee this month. Now we can hire two employees this month,” he said.

Today, the company still tries to remain as lean as possible. “It’s really a matter of discipline. All these companies, they raise a lot of money, they spend a lot of money and I don’t challenge that model. For us, embedding that discipline and frugality in the company in how we run it is something that was important to us,” Pousaz said.

“There’s no problem with spending. Just make sure that when you’re spending, you’re wise about it. You just don’t spray and pray. You see this unfortunately too much with tech companies.”

That’s why Checkout.com mostly invests in its own product. Nearly two-thirds of the company is working in product, IT and engineering. Only 13% of the company is working in sales, which is much less than some of its competitors.

But why did Checkout.com raise hundreds of millions of dollars then? “At some point, you need validation. And the validation was really important for us. When you have Insight, DST, Coatue, GIC, Blossom it changes your dimension,” Pousaz said.

When talking about regulators, Checkout.com has licenses in Brazil, the U.K. and France (for contingency), Hong Kong, Singapore, etc. It’s a never-ending process as the company is still working on licenses in other key markets, such as Japan.

“These regulators are super thorough. You don’t pass because you’re a nice guy, you pass because you have the right processes,” Pousaz said.

I challenged that notion and mentioned the Wirecard collapse. He obviously thinks that Wirecard and Checkout.com are in a different position right now.

“All my money is sitting with JP Morgan, it’s pretty simple. There’s no bank account in the Philippines and funny stuff,” Pousaz said. “The Wirecard story is so big that the real question is — go and ask the question to the auditors. Because the auditors that I have, which for the record is PwC, ask me to show them the bank statements and everything. And there are super thorough, it’s a super long process.”

“How did the Wirecard story happen? I don’t know,” he added.

Startups – TechCrunch

Is it okay for your occupation and eventual business to be in different industries?

Is it necessary to go into an industry that you are likely to start a business in?

What happens if you work in sales at a certain company, say a technology company, but along you think of a good idea for a consumer goods company?

I’m asking this because it seems genuinely discouraged to start a business you don’t have domain experience in. However, this seems to be done by various serial entrepreneurs. Is this the exception and not the rule?

Spin Master Toys was started by two college grads that did not ever work in the toy industry but still seemed to make the company work. It is now a successful global company.

Would like to get peoples thoughts.

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What’s different about hiring data scientists in 2020?

It’s 2020 and the world has changed remarkably, including in how companies screen data science candidates. While many things have changed, there is one change that stands out above the rest. At The Data Incubator, we run a data science fellowship and are responsible for hundreds of data science hires each year. We have observed these hires go from a rare practice to being standard for over 80% of hiring companies. Many of the holdouts tend to be the largest (and traditionally most cautious) enterprises. At this point, they are at a serious competitive disadvantage in hiring.

Historically, data science hiring practices evolved from software engineering. A hallmark of software engineering interviewing is the dreaded brain teaser, puzzles like “How many golf balls would fit inside a Boeing 747?” or “Implement the quick-sort algorithm on the whiteboard.” Candidates will study for weeks or months for these and the hiring website Glassdoor has an entire section devoted to them. In data science, the traditional coding brain teaser has been supplemented with statistics ones as well — “What is the probability that the sum of two dice rolls is divisible by three?” Over the years, companies are starting to realize that these brain teasers are not terribly effective and have started cutting down their usage.

In their place, firms are focusing on project-based data assessments. These ask data science candidates to analyze real-world data provided by the company. Rather than having a single correct answer, project-based assessments are often more open-ended, encouraging exploration. Interviewees typically submit code and a write-up of their results. These have a number of advantages, both in terms of form and substance.

First, the environment for data assessments is far more realistic. Brain teasers unnecessarily put candidates on the spot or compel them to awkwardly code on a whiteboard. Because answers to brain teasers are readily Google-able, internet resources are off-limits. On the job, it is unlikely that you’ll be asked to code on a whiteboard or perform mental math with someone peering over your shoulder. It is incomprehensible that you’ll be denied internet access during work hours. Data assessments also allow the applicants to complete the assessment at a more realistic pace, using their favorite IDE or coding environment.

“Take-home challenges give you a chance to simulate how the candidate will perform on the job more realistically than with puzzle interview questions,” said Sean Gerrish, an engineering manager and author of “How Smart Machines Think.”

Second, the substance of data assessments is also more realistic. By design, brainteasers are tricky or test knowledge of well-known algorithms. In real life, one would never write these algorithms by hand (you would use one of the dozens of solutions freely available on the internet) and the problems encountered on the job are rarely tricky in the same way. By giving candidates real data they might work with and structuring the deliverable in line with how results are actually shared at the company, data projects are more closely aligned with actual job skills.

Jesse Anderson, an industry veteran and author of “Data Teams,” is a big fan of data assessments: “It’s a mutually beneficial setup. Interviewees are given a fighting chance that mimics the real-world. Managers get closer to an on-the-job look at a candidate’s work and abilities.” Project-based assessments have the added benefit of assessing written communication strength, an increasingly important skill in the work-from-home world of COVID-19.

Finally, written technical project work can help avoid bias by de-emphasizing traditional but prejudicially fraught aspects of the hiring process. Resumes with Hispanic and African American names receive fewer callbacks than the same resume with white names. In response, minority candidates deliberately “whiten” their resumes to compensate. In-person interviews often rely on similarly problematic gut feel. By emphasizing an assessment closely tied to job performance, interviewers can focus their energies on actual qualifications, rather than relying on potentially biased “instincts.” Companies looking to embrace #BLM and #MeToo beyond hashtagging may consider how tweaking their hiring processes can lead to greater equality.

The exact form of data assessments vary. At The Data Incubator, we found that over 60% of firms provide take-home data assessments. These best simulate the actual work environment, allowing the candidate to work from home (typically) over the course of a few days. Another roughly 20% require interview data projects, where candidates analyze data as a part of the interview process. While candidates face more time pressure from these, they also do not feel the pressure to ceaselessly work on the assessment. “Take-home challenges take a lot of time,” explains Field Cady, an experienced data scientist and author of “The Data Science Handbook.” “This is a big chore for candidates and can be unfair (for example) to people with family commitments who can’t afford to spend many evening hours on the challenge.”

To reduce the number of custom data projects, smart candidates are preemptively building their own portfolio projects to showcase their skills and companies are increasingly accepting these in lieu of custom work.

Companies relying on old-fashioned brainteasers are a vanishing breed. Of the recalcitrant 20% of employers still sticking with brainteasers, most are the larger, more established enterprises that are usually slower to adapt to change. They need to realize that the antiquated hiring process doesn’t just look quaint, it’s actively driving candidates away. At a recent virtual conference, one of my fellow panelists was a data science new hire who explained that he had turned down opportunities based on the firm’s poor screening process.

How strong can the team be if the hiring process is so outmoded? This sentiment is also widely shared by the Ph.D.s completing The Data Incubator’s data science fellowship. Companies that fail to embrace the new reality are losing the battle for top talent.

Startups – TechCrunch

How do you guys balance working on the different layers of your tech stack?

I use Go, Typescript, and Python for my app. I usually dedicate weeks at a time to different parts of the app so transitioning working on a different layer feels weird.

How do you guys balance working on the different layers of your tech stack?

Do you dedicate days to different parts or …? What do you do?

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