Hebbia wants to make Ctrl-F (or Command-F) actually useful through better AI

Deep learning has made tremendous strides in recent years, with new systems and models like GPT-3 offering higher-quality interpretations of human language, empowering developers to use these concepts in more diverse applications. We can see these developments in our text-to-speech voice recorders and dual language translation apps, which have gotten shockingly good these days.

But what is the next wave of functionality that this AI infrastructure can empower? Hebbia wants to find out.

Hebbia today is a startup but really a product studio, a sort of sketchpad for AI ideas founded by George Sivulka (a PhD student from Stanford currently on leave) and a mélange of three other Stanford AI researchers and engineers. The group, using the new deep learning techniques and models available today, is trying to push the boundaries of what knowledge graphs, semantic analysis and AI can ultimately do for human productivity.

Sivulka was inspired to focus on this domain from witnessing his friends’ experiences working in the knowledge economy. “A lot of my peers … everyone goes into these white-collar jobs where they’re sitting down and just reading immense quantities of information all day,” Sivulka said. “People become banking analysts and dig through SEC forms for one or two lines of information, or go to law school or become legal analysts and do the same thing… [They’re] just bogged down by these walls of text, by this like avalanche of information that is impossible to make sense of.”

(Tell me about it).

What he and his team want to do is supercharge human productivity by building search, analysis and summarization tools that can help you make sense of your own, personal universe of knowledge. “The idea is that Hebbia is building these productivity tools for thought that augment the way you do work. They’re things that actually control the information input and outputs that you have to deal with every day,” Sivulka said.

It’s an ambitious vision, so they had to start somewhere. Their first product, which is what got me excited about the vision, is a Chrome plugin that’s been in private beta and is being released to the world more broadly today (note: it’s still unlisted in the Chrome Store for now). The plugin upgrades the search functionality in Chrome to go beyond mere text pattern matching to begin to comprehend what your query actually is and how it might be answered given the text on a page. Here’s a demo of the plugin on TechCrunch:

Hebbia’s Ctrl-F product on TechCrunch. Image via Hebbia.

So, for instance, you could Ctrl-F on a Wikipedia page and ask “Where did this person live?” and the plugin can determine that you are asking for locations and begin to highlight text on that page with relevant information. It’s AI, and pretty beta AI at that, so of course, your experience can and will be inconsistent right now. But as Hebbia tunes its models and improves its understanding of text, the hope is that browser search can be completely transformed and become a massive productivity boost.

Sivulka is something of an early wunderkind. He worked at NASA as a teenager, and graduated from his bachelor’s at Stanford in 2.5 years, finishing his master’s a bit more than a year later, and started a PhD before getting waylaid by Hebbia.

Hebbia’s vision has already attracted the notice of VCs in just its early months. Ann Miura-Ko at Floodgate led a $ 1.1 million pre-seed round that was joined by Naval Ravikant, Peter Thiel, Kevin Hartz, Michael Fertik and Cory Levy.

Sivulka notes that their Ctrl-F product is the main focus for the company right now, and acts as a sort of gateway into the larger potential that knowledge graphs and personal productivity offer. “This is one of the final frontiers of what computers can do,” Sivulka said, noting that computation has already revolutionized many fields by digitizing data and making it easier to process. With Ctrl-F, “this is a baseline technology, [we’re] just scratching the surface of what we can do with this.”

Startups – TechCrunch

Hebbia wants to make Ctrl-F (or Command-F) actually useful through better AI

Deep learning has made tremendous strides in recent years, with new systems and models like GPT-3 offering higher-quality interpretations of human language, empowering developers to use these concepts in more diverse applications. We can see these developments in our text-to-speech voice recorders and dual language translation apps, which have gotten shockingly good these days.

But what is the next wave of functionality that this AI infrastructure can empower? Hebbia wants to find out.

Hebbia today is a startup but really a product studio, a sort of sketchpad for AI ideas founded by George Sivulka (a PhD student from Stanford currently on leave) and a mélange of three other Stanford AI researchers and engineers. The group, using the new deep learning techniques and models available today, is trying to push the boundaries of what knowledge graphs, semantic analysis and AI can ultimately do for human productivity.

Sivulka was inspired to focus on this domain from witnessing his friends’ experiences working in the knowledge economy. “A lot of my peers … everyone goes into these white-collar jobs where they’re sitting down and just reading immense quantities of information all day,” Sivulka said. “People become banking analysts and dig through SEC forms for one or two lines of information, or go to law school or become legal analysts and do the same thing… [They’re] just bogged down by these walls of text, by this like avalanche of information that is impossible to make sense of.”

(Tell me about it).

What he and his team want to do is supercharge human productivity by building search, analysis and summarization tools that can help you make sense of your own, personal universe of knowledge. “The idea is that Hebbia is building these productivity tools for thought that augment the way you do work. They’re things that actually control the information input and outputs that you have to deal with every day,” Sivulka said.

It’s an ambitious vision, so they had to start somewhere. Their first product, which is what got me excited about the vision, is a Chrome plugin that’s been in private beta and is being released to the world more broadly today (note: it’s still unlisted in the Chrome Store for now). The plugin upgrades the search functionality in Chrome to go beyond mere text pattern matching to begin to comprehend what your query actually is and how it might be answered given the text on a page. Here’s a demo of the plugin on TechCrunch:

Hebbia’s Ctrl-F product on TechCrunch. Image via Hebbia.

So, for instance, you could Ctrl-F on a Wikipedia page and ask “Where did this person live?” and the plugin can determine that you are asking for locations and begin to highlight text on that page with relevant information. It’s AI, and pretty beta AI at that, so of course, your experience can and will be inconsistent right now. But as Hebbia tunes its models and improves its understanding of text, the hope is that browser search can be completely transformed and become a massive productivity boost.

Sivulka is something of an early wunderkind. He worked at NASA as a teenager, and graduated from his bachelor’s at Stanford in 2.5 years, finishing his master’s a bit more than a year later, and started a PhD before getting waylaid by Hebbia.

Hebbia’s vision has already attracted the notice of VCs in just its early months. Ann Miura-Ko at Floodgate led a $ 1.1 million pre-seed round that was joined by Naval Ravikant, Peter Thiel, Kevin Hartz, Michael Fertik and Cory Levy.

Sivulka notes that their Ctrl-F product is the main focus for the company right now, and acts as a sort of gateway into the larger potential that knowledge graphs and personal productivity offer. “This is one of the final frontiers of what computers can do,” Sivulka said, noting that computation has already revolutionized many fields by digitizing data and making it easier to process. With Ctrl-F, “this is a baseline technology, [we’re] just scratching the surface of what we can do with this.”

Startups – TechCrunch

Hebbia wants to make Ctrl-F (or Command-F) actually useful through better AI

Deep learning has made tremendous strides in recent years, with new systems and models like GPT-3 offering higher quality interpretations of human language, empowering developers to use these concepts in more diverse applications. We can see these developments in our text-to-speech voice recorders and dual language translation apps, which have gotten shockingly good these days.

But what is the next wave of functionality that this AI infrastructure can empower? Hebbia wants to find out.

Hebbia today is a startup but really a product studio, a sort of sketchpad for AI ideas founded by George Sivulka, a PhD student from Stanford (currently on leave) and a mélange of three other Stanford AI researchers and engineers. The group, using the new deep learning techniques and models available today, is trying to push the boundaries of what knowledge graphs, semantic analysis, and AI can ultimately do for human productivity.

Sivulka was inspired to focus on this domain from witnessing his friends’ experiences working in the knowledge economy. “A lot of my peers … everyone goes into these white-collar jobs where they’re sitting down and just reading immense quantities of information all day,” Sivulka said. “People become banking analysts and dig through SEC forms for one or two lines of information, or go to law school or become legal analysts and do the same thing… [They’re] just bogged down by these walls of text, by this like avalanche of information that is impossible to make sense of.”

(Tell me about it).

What he and his team want to do is supercharge human productivity by building search, analysis, and summarization tools that can help you make sense of your own, personal universe of knowledge. “The idea is that Hebbia is building these productivity tools for thought that augment the way that you do work. They’re things that actually control the information input and outputs that you have to deal with every day,” Sivulka said.

It’s an ambitious vision, so they had to start somewhere. Their first product, which is what got me excited about the vision, is a Chrome plugin that’s been in private beta and is being released to the world more broadly today (note: it’s still unlisted in the Chrome Store for now). The plugin upgrades the search functionality in Chrome to go beyond mere text pattern matching to begin to comprehend what your query actually is and how it might be answered given the text on a page. Here’s a demo of the plugin on TechCrunch:

Hebbia’s Ctrl-F product on TechCrunch. Photo via Hebbia.

So, for instance, you could Ctrl-F on a Wikipedia page and ask “Where did this person live?” and the plugin can determine that you are asking for locations and begin to highlight text on that page with relevant information. It’s AI, and pretty beta AI at that, so of course, your experience can and will be inconsistent right now. But as Hebbia tunes its models and improves its understanding of text, the hope is that browser search can be completely transformed and become a massive productivity boost.

Sivulka is something of an early wunderkind. He worked at NASA as a teenager, and graduated from his bachelor’s at Stanford in 2.5 years, finishing his master’s a bit more than a year later, and started a PhD before getting waylaid by Hebbia.

Hebbia’s vision has already attracted the notice of VCs in just its early months. Ann Miura-Ko at Floodgate led a $ 1.1 million pre-seed round that was joined by Naval Ravikant, Peter Thiel, Kevin Hartz, Michael Fertik and Cory Levy.

Sivulka notes that their Ctrl-F product is the main focus for the company right now, and acts as a sort of gateway into the larger potential that knowledge graphs and personal productivity offer. “This is one of the final frontiers of what computers can do,” Sivulka said, noting that computation has already revolutionized many fields by digitizing data and making it easier to process. With Ctrl-F, “this is a baseline technology, [we’re] just scratching the surface of what we can do with this.”

Startups – TechCrunch

Hebbia wants to make Ctrl-F (or Command-F) actually useful through better AI

Deep learning has made tremendous strides in recent years, with new systems and models like GPT-3 offering higher quality interpretations of human language, empowering developers to use these concepts in more diverse applications. We can see these developments in our text-to-speech voice recorders and dual language translation apps, which have gotten shockingly good these days.

But what is the next wave of functionality that this AI infrastructure can empower? Hebbia wants to find out.

Hebbia today is a startup but really a product studio, a sort of sketchpad for AI ideas founded by George Sivulka, a PhD student from Stanford (currently on leave) and a mélange of three other Stanford AI researchers and engineers. The group, using the new deep learning techniques and models available today, is trying to push the boundaries of what knowledge graphs, semantic analysis, and AI can ultimately do for human productivity.

Sivulka was inspired to focus on this domain from witnessing his friends’ experiences working in the knowledge economy. “A lot of my peers … everyone goes into these white-collar jobs where they’re sitting down and just reading immense quantities of information all day,” Sivulka said. “People become banking analysts and dig through SEC forms for one or two lines of information, or go to law school or become legal analysts and do the same thing… [They’re] just bogged down by these walls of text, by this like avalanche of information that is impossible to make sense of.”

(Tell me about it).

What he and his team want to do is supercharge human productivity by building search, analysis, and summarization tools that can help you make sense of your own, personal universe of knowledge. “The idea is that Hebbia is building these productivity tools for thought that augment the way that you do work. They’re things that actually control the information input and outputs that you have to deal with every day,” Sivulka said.

It’s an ambitious vision, so they had to start somewhere. Their first product, which is what got me excited about the vision, is a Chrome plugin that’s been in private beta and is being released to the world more broadly today (note: it’s still unlisted in the Chrome Store for now). The plugin upgrades the search functionality in Chrome to go beyond mere text pattern matching to begin to comprehend what your query actually is and how it might be answered given the text on a page. Here’s a demo of the plugin on TechCrunch:

Hebbia’s Ctrl-F product on TechCrunch. Photo via Hebbia.

So, for instance, you could Ctrl-F on a Wikipedia page and ask “Where did this person live?” and the plugin can determine that you are asking for locations and begin to highlight text on that page with relevant information. It’s AI, and pretty beta AI at that, so of course, your experience can and will be inconsistent right now. But as Hebbia tunes its models and improves its understanding of text, the hope is that browser search can be completely transformed and become a massive productivity boost.

Sivulka is something of an early wunderkind. He worked at NASA as a teenager, and graduated from his bachelor’s at Stanford in 2.5 years, finishing his master’s a bit more than a year later, and started a PhD before getting waylaid by Hebbia.

Hebbia’s vision has already attracted the notice of VCs in just its early months. Ann Miura-Ko at Floodgate led a $ 1.1 million pre-seed round that was joined by Naval Ravikant, Peter Thiel, Kevin Hartz, Michael Fertik and Cory Levy.

Sivulka notes that their Ctrl-F product is the main focus for the company right now, and acts as a sort of gateway into the larger potential that knowledge graphs and personal productivity offer. “This is one of the final frontiers of what computers can do,” Sivulka said, noting that computation has already revolutionized many fields by digitizing data and making it easier to process. With Ctrl-F, “this is a baseline technology, [we’re] just scratching the surface of what we can do with this.”

Startups – TechCrunch

Hebbia wants to make Ctrl-F (or Command-F) actually useful through better AI

Deep learning has made tremendous strides in recent years, with new systems and models like GPT-3 offering higher quality interpretations of human language, empowering developers to use these concepts in more diverse applications. We can see these developments in our text-to-speech voice recorders and dual language translation apps, which have gotten shockingly good these days.

But what is the next wave of functionality that this AI infrastructure can empower? Hebbia wants to find out.

Hebbia today is a startup but really a product studio, a sort of sketchpad for AI ideas founded by George Sivulka, a PhD student from Stanford (currently on leave) and a mélange of three other Stanford AI researchers and engineers. The group, using the new deep learning techniques and models available today, is trying to push the boundaries of what knowledge graphs, semantic analysis, and AI can ultimately do for human productivity.

Sivulka was inspired to focus on this domain from witnessing his friends’ experiences working in the knowledge economy. “A lot of my peers … everyone goes into these white-collar jobs where they’re sitting down and just reading immense quantities of information all day,” Sivulka said. “People become banking analysts and dig through SEC forms for one or two lines of information, or go to law school or become legal analysts and do the same thing… [They’re] just bogged down by these walls of text, by this like avalanche of information that is impossible to make sense of.”

(Tell me about it).

What he and his team want to do is supercharge human productivity by building search, analysis, and summarization tools that can help you make sense of your own, personal universe of knowledge. “The idea is that Hebbia is building these productivity tools for thought that augment the way that you do work. They’re things that actually control the information input and outputs that you have to deal with every day,” Sivulka said.

It’s an ambitious vision, so they had to start somewhere. Their first product, which is what got me excited about the vision, is a Chrome plugin that’s been in private beta and is being released to the world more broadly today (note: it’s still unlisted in the Chrome Store for now). The plugin upgrades the search functionality in Chrome to go beyond mere text pattern matching to begin to comprehend what your query actually is and how it might be answered given the text on a page. Here’s a demo of the plugin on TechCrunch:

Hebbia’s Ctrl-F product on TechCrunch. Photo via Hebbia.

So, for instance, you could Ctrl-F on a Wikipedia page and ask “Where did this person live?” and the plugin can determine that you are asking for locations and begin to highlight text on that page with relevant information. It’s AI, and pretty beta AI at that, so of course, your experience can and will be inconsistent right now. But as Hebbia tunes its models and improves its understanding of text, the hope is that browser search can be completely transformed and become a massive productivity boost.

Sivulka is something of an early wunderkind. He worked at NASA as a teenager, and graduated from his bachelor’s at Stanford in 2.5 years, finishing his master’s a bit more than a year later, and started a PhD before getting waylaid by Hebbia.

Hebbia’s vision has already attracted the notice of VCs in just its early months. Ann Miura-Ko at Floodgate led a $ 1.1 million pre-seed round that was joined by Naval Ravikant, Peter Thiel, Kevin Hartz, Michael Fertik and Cory Levy.

Sivulka notes that their Ctrl-F product is the main focus for the company right now, and acts as a sort of gateway into the larger potential that knowledge graphs and personal productivity offer. “This is one of the final frontiers of what computers can do,” Sivulka said, noting that computation has already revolutionized many fields by digitizing data and making it easier to process. With Ctrl-F, “this is a baseline technology, [we’re] just scratching the surface of what we can do with this.”

Startups – TechCrunch

When Peter Thiel talks about the importance of distribution for startups in Zero to One is he actually referring to the place through which a startup provides its product or a startup’s sales/customer acquisition strategy?

He says: “Distribution is something of a catchall term. It essentially refers to how you get a product out to consumers. More generally, it can refer to how you spread the message about your company. (…) But for whatever reason, people do not get distribution. They tend to overlook it. It is the single topic whose importance people understand least. Even if you have an incredibly fantastic product, you still have to get it out to people.”

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

How to create a product that people actually use: A Minecraft case study

Minecraft's design really fascinates me. The game looks so simple on the surface, but it's architected in such a brilliant way. It's no luck that it's the most popular game of all time, even through they barely spent anything on marketing.

To understand the psychology behind the game, I have used the Hook Model developed by Nir Eyal as a framework. It's a model in 4 steps that helps you understand why some products hook people in and create habits that integrate the product in their lifestyles.

1. TRIGGER

Every habit starts with a trigger that initiates the action.
There are 2 types of triggers: external and internal.

EXTERNAL

These triggers come from your environment. For Minecraft, the strongest external trigger is YouTube. Since the beginning, the creators of Minecraft encouraged fans to put videos on YouTube and that helped growth a lot. It's partly why it's the most popular game on the platform until this day.

Vu Bui, their chief operating officer, told the Guardian: "We've essentially outsourced YouTube videos to a community of millions of people, and what they come up with is more creative than anything we could make ourselves."

INTERNAL

These triggers come from the users themselves. It's when they are making mental associations with the product, they tie it to an emotion. Here, negative emotions are strong triggers, because we want to get rid of them, so they will push us to act. Minecraft like many other forms of entertainment relies on the trigger of boredom. The game is interesting, it's intrinsically fun to play and there is always something new to interact with or create. It's a bit similar to Instagram and YouTube that have endless feeds of new content to make sure you are never bored.

Loneliness is another internal trigger for Minecraft. The game is social, it's built around their community. People love sharing and connecting with other players. Friends can invite you to play, you can chat with them, see what they are building and collaborate together.

2. SIMPLE ACTION

When you design an experience, you want users to make a certain action, but the key here is to make that first action as simple and easy as possible. According to Nir Eyal, “the simpler you can make the action, the more likely it is to occur.”

For Minecraft, it's simply starting the game. If you are invited by a friend, you can join their world in a click, and if you want to create your own, it's matter of seconds. You pick the mode you want to play and from there you do whatever you want. There is no real goal in Minecraft, so you are the one setting your goals. It means you can play only 10min if you wanted to or spend hours on it.

3. VARIABLE REWARD

Activity level is a function of how soon the participant expects a reward to occur. So if you know something interesting is about to happen soon, you will play harder. On the opposite, if you leveled up recently and have to collect thousands of points before you can do it again, you will be a bit less active because your motivation will be lower.

Randomness maintains the player's interest longer and makes them more consistent. They don't know exactly when the reward will come, but they know it roughly based on their previous experience. If the reward is interesting, there is always a reason to continue playing. That's why Minecraft has this element of variability. In every game, you land in a new random map and each map has unique resources, some of which are rare and difficult to find, so playing becomes like an exciting exploration.

4. INVESTMENT

Now that you have triggered your users to take actions and you made them happy with rewards, what is the 'bit of work' they can do to increase the likelihood of coming back?

In Minecraft, after you played the game, you have more reasons to come back because you now have the world you created waiting for you. Maybe you build a structure that is unfinished, or you customized your character with skin packs and you want to show it to your friends.

The point is that you left something in Minecraft, you have invested part of yourself into it and personalized the game experience to make it yours.

Next time the player sees a trigger for Minecraft, they will be even more willing to play the game.

The cycle continues.

Hope you enjoyed my analysis! Let me know if you have any questions!
I am going deeper in this video I made. Feel free to check it out if you want to learn more

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

Financial related: what’s this things i want to do actually called in the financial / investor world? I need guidance so I can Google and teach myself. But I’m stuck.

Financial related.

Looking for advice on what this might be classified as so I can then do proper research to find the right financial and legal people and mentors to help me.

There are two parts to my business. One continuous sales cycle product type. Typical b2b things. Typical cycles. Room for growth, and upselling, didn't related products, and subscriptions packages with those products etc.

But the second part of my business involves much larger projects. They would be running continuously, but each project start is staggered from the next. Each one is very long term, a completely different beast, and the sales process is very long (years) and highly beuracratic involving super complex contracts with dozens of key players. Negotiations, and more. We can kinda prep to eventually do lower level contracts (under 100k setup costs), but the return on the low level stuff isn't worthwhile. We can't even begin to do any decent return projects until we have a minimum of 350k for our infrastructure / set up for these long haul beasts, and most excellent ones we want to be at way down the line will cost us infrastructure costs and setup upwards of a few million (all in, including salarys, everything necessary without me inflating numbers etc). Note I'm not doing anything new here. This is all typical for my industry.

The first side of the day to day operations, of the typical products/sales process, is essentially funding the second one. This keeps the lights on and the doors open. It gets us up in the morning. We are, just starting anyways and nowhere near amassing enough. So, I want to boost this second side with funding. Huge returns if we do it right.

Ideally i want a pool of investors that get something akin to dividends, if we make money on those projects they do. But not equity. Or am I calling it the wrong thing. The more I collect the more diversified we can be in those huge arenas. We can't promise we will succeed though either. But we really don't want to do equity shares or convertible notes etc, these people will be funding projects not giving money to the company for equity or shares or seats. We aren't doing another round, we are doing continuous fund collections for this and we hope our success and results gain additional investors.

What other financial instruments are there? Am i overlooking things? Are we really just collecting money, creating a pool and contracts for each person dictating risk? Are we opening ourselves as a mutual fund kinda things and need to be beholden to those financial regulatory thing and I'm just calling it something else? Are they just gifts with odd contracts?

I'm really lost at what to call this and where it all fits in in the financial world?

I'm looking for investors. But it doesn't feel like an angel or vc related type, maybe a growth thing, but it's not perfectly related to the first so it's not actually growth of anything. But it's not a seed round and the project costs are well above family and friends levels at well over 150k.

Anyways I'm starting to give all sorts of examples, but instead let me see what you all have for pointing me in the right direction. Or asking clarifying questions. I need to learn what this is called so i can set it up right with the right legal people and financial folks and then prospect for the right people.

Thanks!

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

Basingstoke-based InfoSum raises €12.7 million to help companies connect customer data, without actually sharing it

InfoSum, a decentralized marketing infrastructure, has announced the completion of its Series A funding round, raising around €12.7 million. The investment was led by leading venture capital firms Upfront Ventures and IA Ventures and supported by strategic partners Ascential, Akamai, Experian, ITV and AT&T’s Xandr.

Founded in 2016, InfoSum has built one of the world’s first decentralized marketing infrastructures that enables companies of every size and industry to collaborate across first and second-party data sets, to create a superior experience for consumers. Powered by this privacy-first solution, leading broadcasters, brands and enterprise companies are working seamlessly on first-party marketing programmes, with consumer data privacy preserved at every step. These companies can now create a single system of customer identity without ever moving data between parties.

The funding will be used to accelerate InfoSum’s expansion across North America and Europe. Nick Halstead CEO and Founder of InfoSum said “InfoSum is providing the industry with a decentralized marketing infrastructure that removes all privacy, identity and trust barriers, enabling seamless data connectivity across companies.

This investment is a testament to the success InfoSum is experiencing and its potential for rapid growth across Europe and North America. I’m very pleased to welcome Brian in his new role. He brings invaluable knowledge and experience to our leadership team as we increase our presence in North America.”‍

Brian Lesser, Executive Chairman at InfoSum said: “InfoSum is changing the way marketing data is managed. Our decentralized solution prioritizes privacy while improving a company’s ability to learn more about their customers and develop relevant, high-performing marketing and engagement programs. With the success it is already seeing in the UK and Europe, I’m thrilled to help establish InfoSum as a global standard for marketing infrastructure. In North America specifically, data-centric companies are thirsting for a new privacy-first solution to data collaboration that allows them to retain control of their data and drive more value.”

EU-Startups

When you pitch a product idea to friends and family that is unanimously well-liked, how do you determine if it actually fits a market need especially if the product idea currently does not exist or similar apps exist but not immensely successful.

I've been trying to figure out whether a product idea I have is viable or not and using feedback from pitching the idea to friends and family to gauge the viability of the market and the product. However, my standard of judgment is that because no app that is immensely popular such as instagram or tinder or facebook exists then it must not be a good idea because otherwise it would already exist.

I know this is a really irrational perspective and it is probably the cognitive dissonance in my brain that always prevents me from actually pursuing this idea, so I would like to hear the thoughts of people who actually have went on to build successful (or not) startups. They say founders should have 1000% faith in their idea. While I think my idea is great, I cant stop second guessing myself with numerous reasons as to why it would not be viable for fear of failure.

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!